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International Tokyo Toy Show logo
Pippin panorama at TokyoToyShow95

Bandai's Pippin exhibit in 1995.

The International Tokyo Toy Show (東京おもちゃショー) is an annual event organized by The Japan Toy Association. It is the largest toy industry trade show in Japan, held at the Tokyo International Exhibition Center (also known as Tokyo Big Sight) in June or July of each year. The annual Japan Toy Awards are also presented at this event.[1]

Bandai demonstrated prototypes of their Playdia and Pippin consoles at the 1994 and 1995 events, respectively.[2][3] After stepping down from his executive roles at Bandai in 2004,[4] Makoto Yamashina (山科 誠) became the president of The Japan Toy Association.[5] His father, Naoharu Yamashina (山科 直治), had previously served as the chairman of the The Japan Toy Association.[6]

HistoryEdit

Early yearsEdit

1st Japan International Toy Fair 62

Logo of the 1st Japan International Toy Fair in 1962.

  • 1962 - The 1st Japan International Toy Fair (日本玩具国際見本市) was organized by The Japan International Toy Fair Association and held October 17-20 at the old Tokyo Trade Center / Municipal Hall in Ōtemachi, Chiyoda, Tokyo. 82 Japanese manufacturers and nearly 20,000 visitors and buyers were in attendance.[7][8]
  • 1964 - The World Toy Fair was held in November at a leading department store in Tokyo.[9]
Tokyo Trade Center 1970 7thJITF

The Tokyo Trade Center was used as the site of the toy fair in its early years.

  • 1967 - The Japan Toy Association was established.[10]
  • 1968 - The 7th Japan International Toy Fair was held in mid-October at the old Tokyo Trade Center / Municipal Hall. 98 Japanese manufacturers were in attendance. Japan's exports surpassed that of West Germany, the former leader of the toy export market.[11]
  • 1970 - The 9th Japan International Toy Fair was held September 9-11 at the old Tokyo Trade Center / Municipal Hall. 91 Japanese manufacturers and an estimated 15,000 buyers were in attendance.[12][13]
12th Japan International Toy Fair 73

Banner of the 12th Japan International Toy Fair in 1973.

  • 1973 - The 12th Japan International Toy Fair was held in early October at the old Tokyo Trade Center / Municipal Hall. About 61% of Japanese toy exports were to the United States at the time.[14]
  • 1977 - The event was renamed the Tokyo International Toy Trade Fair (東京国際玩具見本市).[15]
  • 1982 - Held at the old Tokyo International Exhibition Center (東京国際見本市会場) in Harumi (晴海), Chūō, Tokyo,[16] the event was renamed the Tokyo Toy Show (東京おもちゃショー).[15]

Bandai at the Tokyo Toy ShowEdit

1983 Tokyo Toy Show

1983 Tokyo Toy Show

(skip to 8m26s for Bandai)

  • 1983 - Held in June at the old Tokyo International Exhibition Center in Harumi.[17] A single representative from Hasbro first saw Takara's Diaclone and Micro Change toys, which would form the Transformers toy line.[18] Video gaming in Japan gained prominence as Nintendo's Family Computer and Bandai's RX-78 microcomputer were released the following month.[10][19]
  • 1984 - Held at the old Tokyo International Exhibition Center in Harumi.[20]
  • 1987 - Held at the old Tokyo International Exhibition Center in Harumi.[21]
  • 1989 - Held in June at the old Tokyo International Exhibition Center in Harumi.[22]
Makuhari Messe 1990

Makuhari Messe in 1990.

1994 Tokyo Toy Show

1994 Tokyo Toy Show

(skip to 36s for BA-X)

  • 1994 - Held June 2-5 at Makuhari Messe. Bandai unveiled the BA-X Bandai Home Entertainment Interactive System,[2] which would be released as the Playdia three months later.[28]
1995 Tokyo Toy Show

1995 Tokyo Toy Show

(skip to 10m29s for Pippin)

Pippin and Oracion at TokyoToyShow95

Demonstration of a Pippin prototype in 1995.

1997 Tokyo Toy Show

1997 Tokyo Toy Show

(skip to 45s for Tamagotchi)

  • 1997 - Held for the first time at Tokyo Big Sight. Tamagotchi CD-ROM and related merchandise were major attractions at Bandai's exhibit.[32]
1999 Tokyo Toy Show

1999 Tokyo Toy Show

(skip to 3m45s for WonderSwan)

  • 1999 - Held March 18-21 at Tokyo Big Sight, East Exhibition Hall. The first two days were limited to industry "dealers" and the last two were open to the public. Admission fee was JP¥ 1,000 per person; up to 2 pre-school children were admitted free with an adult on public days.[33] 177 companies exhibited at the event, including 40 foreign exhibitors from 8 countries. 23,355 trade visitors and 64,522 public visitors were in attendance.[34] Bandai showed its new WonderSwan handheld console.[35]
  • 2000 - Held March 16-19 at Tokyo Big Sight. Admission fee was JP¥ 1,000 per person. This was the last event to be sponsored by the Japan International Toy Fair Association, which was merged into The Japan Toy Association.[34] 187 companies exhibited at the event, including 43 foreign exhibitors from 8 countries. 22,137 trade visitors and 68,253 public visitors were in attendance.[36] Bandai showed prototypes of its WonderBorg robotic kit for WonderSwan handheld consoles.[37]
  • 2001 - Held March 22-25 at Tokyo Big Sight. Admission fee was JP¥ 1,000. This was the first event to be sponsored by The Japan Toy Association.[36] 180 companies exhibited at the event, including 43 foreign exhibitors from 8 countries. 19,890 trade visitors and 67,021 public visitors were in attendance.[38]
  • 2002 - Held May 9-12 at Tokyo Big Sight. Admission fee was JP¥ 1,000.[38] Bandai unveiled the SwanCrystal color handheld console.[39]

Decline and closure to the publicEdit

  • 2003 - Held June 10-12 at the Tokyo Metropolitan Industry and Trade Center's Taito-Kan (台東館) Exhibition Hall. Due to the declining birth rate and shrinking toy market in Japan, the event was limited to industry professionals to conduct business negotiations.[40] 92 companies were at the event.[41] A separate Japan Toy Show was open to the public July 31-August 3 at Pacifico Yokohama, Exhibition Hall A-D. Admission fee was JP¥ 1,000.[42]
  • 2004 - Held June 15-17 at Taito-Kan Exhibition Hall. The event was free to industry professionals by invite only. Children were not permitted.[43] 91 companies were at the event,[44] but the limited size of the venue became a problem for exhibitors.[5]
  • 2005 - Held July 19-21 at Tokyo Big Sight, East Exhibition Hall 2-3.[45] The event was free to registered professionals or by invite only.[5] 114 companies exhibited at the event, which was covered by 28 television broadcasts. About 15,000 trade visitors were in attendance, a 28% increase over the previous year.[46]

Reopened to the publicEdit

Tokyo Big Sight at night 2007

Tokyo Big Sight has hosted the Tokyo Toy Show in recent years.

  • 2006 - Held July 13-16 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4, with 50% more space than the previous year.[46] The event adopts the promotional name International Tokyo Toy Show and is re-opened to the public. From this point, the first two days are limited to industry professional "buyers" and the last two are free to the public.[47]
  • 2007 - Held June 28-July 1 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[48]
  • 2008 - Held June 19-22 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[49] The first annual Japan Toy Awards are presented on Tuesday, June 17 before the opening of the show.[50]
  • 2009 - Held July 16-19 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[51]
  • 2010 - Held July 15-18 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[52] Total attendance reached 158,311.[53]
  • 2011 - Held June 16-19 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[54]
  • 2012 - Held June 14-17 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[55]
  • 2013 - Held June 13-16 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[56]
  • 2014 - Held June 12-15 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[57]
  • 2015 - Held June 18-21 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[58]
  • 2016 - Held June 9-12 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4.[59]
  • 2017 - Held June 1-4 at Tokyo Big Sight, East Exhibition Hall 1-3.[60]
  • 2018 - Held June 7-10 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4. About 200 exhibitor companies, 18,981 trade visitors and 141,209 public visitors attended the event.[61][62]
  • 2019 - To be held June 13-16 at Tokyo Big Sight, West Exhibition Hall 1-4. The first two days will be limited to industry professionals and the last two will be open to the public.[62]

ReferencesEdit

  1. International Tokyo Toy Show, World of Toys. 2017. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  2. 2.0 2.1 1994年東京おもちゃショー カクレンジャー ブルースワット (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2013-01-13.
  3. 3.0 3.1 1995年東京おもちゃショー オーレンジャー ビーファイター (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2013-01-19.
  4. バンダイ御曹司がハマった愛欲と金欲 (Japanese), Asahi Shimbun. 2011-12-07.
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Tokyo Toy Show 2005 - Guide (PDF), The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2005-04-15.
  6. Bandai founder left 2.65 billion yen estate, The Japan Times. 1998-10-12.
  7. Japan: Japanese Toy Fair. 1962 by Reuters, British Pathé. 1962-11-01.
  8. Japan International Toy Fair by Scott Bray, ROBOTapedia. 2013. Accessed 2019-02-11.
  9. Japan: World Toy Fair In Tokyo 1964 by Reuters, British Pathé. 1964-11-20.
  10. 10.0 10.1 おもちゃの歴史年表 (Japanese) by トイジャーナル編集局, おもちゃ情報net. 2018. Accessed 2019-02-22.
  11. Japan: 7th International Toy Trade Fair Opens. 1968 by Reuters, British Pathé. 1968-10-17.
  12. Japan: Ninth Japanese Toy Fair Opens 1970 by Reuters, British Pathé. 1970-09-10.
  13. 1970 Ad Japan International Toy Fair Tokyo Trade Center, Period Paper. Accessed 2019-02-11.
  14. Japan: Toy Fair Shows Off Giant Export Industry 1973 by Reuters, British Pathé. 1973-10-05.
  15. 15.0 15.1 東京おもちゃショー 2013 (Japanese), Trade Shows Now!. 2013. Accessed 2019-02-22.
  16. おもちゃの歴史年表 1980~1984年 (Japanese) by トイジャーナル編集局, おもちゃ情報net. 2018. Accessed 2019-03-14.
  17. 1983年東京おもちゃショー (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2013-09-29.
  18. Interview with George Dunsay by Nevermore, TFArchive. 2006-12-31.
  19. RX-78-GUNDAM (バンダイ:1983), K's Dee(ケイズ・ディー)の『パソコン博物館』. 2007-09-30.
  20. 1984年東京おもちゃショー (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2015-03-28.
  21. 1987年東京おもちゃショー マスクマン メタルダー (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2012-09-16.
  22. 1989年東京おもちゃショー Mr.マリック超魔術 (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2017-05-04.
  23. International Outlook (PDF) p.38, Electronic Gaming Monthly #14. 1990-10.
  24. '90 Tokyo Toy Show, Sega Retro. Accessed 2019-02-11.
  25. File:'91 Tokyo Toy Show/Magazine articles (PDF). 1991-07-08.
  26. 巨大サンダーバード2号搬入 おもちゃショー’92 (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2016-12-21.
  27. 1993年東京おもちゃショー ダイレンジャー、グリッドマン (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2012-07-08.
  28. The Bandai Playdia -- Bandai's Educational Home Console by Kelsey Lewin, YouTube. 2017-07-03.
  29. Computer and Video Games 177 (PDF). 1996-08.
  30. Rescheduling of the "Tokyo Game Show", Consumer Entertainment Supplier's Association. 2001-10-12. Archived 2003-11-23.
  31. Tokyo Game Show 1996, Consumer Entertainment Supplier's Association. Sega Retro. Accessed 2019-01-18.
  32. 1997年東京おもちゃショー メガレンジャー ウルトラマンティガ (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2012-07-15.
  33. '99 Tokyo Toy Show, The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2001-02-10.
  34. 34.0 34.1 2000 Tokyo Toy Show, The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2001-02-10.
  35. 1999年東京おもちゃショー ゴーゴーファイブ ウルトラマンガイア (Japanese) by kbigstone, YouTube. 2013-01-25.
  36. 36.0 36.1 2001 Tokyo Toy Show, The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2001-02-10.
  37. 2000東京おもちゃショー開幕 (Japanese) by funatsu, PC Watch. 2000-03-16.
  38. 38.0 38.1 2002 Tokyo Toy Show, The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2002-04-05.
  39. Swan Crystal debuts at the Tokyo Toy Show 2002 by Yukiyoshi Ike Sato, GameSpot. 2006-05-17.
  40. 東京おもちゃショー 2003 (Japanese), The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2003-04-03.
  41. 東京おもちゃショー 2003 出展者一覧 (Japanese), The Japan Toy Association. 2003-05-19. Archived 2004-04-07.
  42. おもちゃみらい博の目的と開催概要 (Japanese), The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2003-07-07.
  43. 東京おもちゃショー 2004 (Japanese), The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2004-06-10.
  44. 東京おもちゃショー 2004 出展者一覧 (Japanese), The Japan Toy Association. 2004-04-14. Archived 2004-06-16.
  45. Tokyo Toy Show 2005, The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2005-07-21.
  46. 46.0 46.1 Tokyo Toy Show 2006 - Exhibitor's Guide (PDF), The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2006-05-02.
  47. International Tokyo Toy Show 2006 - Event, The Japan Toy Association. Archived 2006-07-02.
  48. International Tokyo Toy Show 2007 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  49. International Tokyo Toy Show 2008 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  50. First Japan toy awards handed out by Kazuaki Nagata, The Japan Times. 2008-06-18.
  51. International Tokyo Toy Show 2009 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  52. International Tokyo Toy Show 2010 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  53. 東京おもちゃショー 2010 (Japanese), Trade Shows Now!. 2010. Accessed 2019-02-22.
  54. International Tokyo Toy Show 2011 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  55. International Tokyo Toy Show 2012 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  56. International Tokyo Toy Show 2013 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  57. International Tokyo Toy Show 2014 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  58. International Tokyo Toy Show 2015 - Event Outline, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  59. International Tokyo Toy Show 2016, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  60. International Tokyo Toy Show 2017, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  61. International Tokyo Toy Show 2018, The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-06.
  62. 62.0 62.1 Exhibitor's Guide - Tokyo Toy Show 2019 (PDF), The Japan Toy Association. Accessed 2019-01-07.

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit